Articles Tagged with whistleblowers’ law firm for military contract

israel-palacio-463979-copy-300x200While qui tam cases brought under the False Claims Act (FCA) are often related to health care, qui tam cases can be in connection to any type of claim made to the federal government for payment. In addition to the health care industry, defense contractors are another area in which the government is vulnerable to fraudulent schemes. For example, Lockheed Martin Corporation has agreed to settle FCA allegations by paying the federal government $4.4 million. Lockheed is accused of providing defective communications systems to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Defective Equipment for the Military

The defense contractor provided Radio Frequency Distribution System (RFDS) for the Coast Guard’s National Security Cutters. According to the U.S. attorneys, the RFDS failed to be able to conduct simultaneous operations, meaning it could receive and transmit different radio signals at the same time without interference.

Last week, we flag2wrote about the importance of the False Claims Act as a tool for fighting defense contract fraud.  This week, we continue that discussion by focusing on a case that we touched upon in last week’s post.  This case stands out as particularly egregious of allegations that, if true, could have cost countless military members their lives.  It is an important example of the type of military contract fraud that honest whistleblowers can help bring to an end when they partner with the team at our government contract fraud law firm.

Defense Contractor to Pay $3 Million to Settle Allegations Regarding Ballistic Helmets that Failed Safety Tests

Earlier this year, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) issued a press release announcing that ArmorSource, LLC would pay $3 million to settle a lawsuit filed pursuant to the False Claims Act.  As the DOJ explains, the U.S. Army entered into a contract with ArmorSource in 2006 pursuant to which the company was to manufacture Advanced Combat Helmets (“ACHs”).  ACHs are used by soldiers in combat and made out of Kevlar to help provide ballistic protection for the wearer.  According to the government, from 2006 to 2009, ArmorSource provided the Army with ACHs that did not conform to the requirementsoldierss in the government contract and did not meet contract performance standards.  The Army began recalling the ArmorSource helmets in May 2010 after several lots failed ballistic safety tests.