samson-duborg-rankin-91091-unsplash-copy-300x200When filing any type of lawsuit, you will need solid evidence to back up your claim. In a qui tam, or whistleblower, lawsuit, that evidence must be solid and clearly establish that your employer, or another individual or entity, defrauded the government. Investigations into a qui tam lawsuit are extensive and take a great deal of time and resources. The courts will likely not move ahead with one unless there is substantial evidence of wrongdoing.

When gathering this evidence, whistleblowers will run into three types — evidence you have, evidence you do not have but can obtain, and evidence that you cannot obtain. Each of these categories of evidence presents its own issues.

Evidence You Have

austin-distel-1555609-unsplash-copy-300x225If you are considering blowing the whistle on your employer’s wrongful actions that are defrauding the government, employment retaliation is a real fear. In fact, it is one of the biggest reasons employees do not come forward and blow the whistle. However, this should never keep you from trying to make things right. You should know you have legal rights that protect you from employer retaliation.

When an employer retaliates against you for whistleblowing, your best option is to file a whistleblower retaliation lawsuit with the California Superior Court. Prior to doing so, however, you may have to file a complaint with a government agency.  

Protection Under Labor Code 1102.5 LC

nicolas-thomas-546101-unsplash-copy-300x200Many people have heard of whistleblowers on the nightly news, or perhaps in movies or on television dramas. However, they may not know exactly what a whistleblower is. Maybe they have never even heard of the term ‘qui tam’ before. So, what exactly is a whistleblower, and why would such a person ever file a lawsuit? Do whistleblowers have any protection while blowing the whistle, and do they receive any compensation for it?

These are just some of the most common questions surrounding whistleblower lawsuits, and the answers to them are below.

What Does ‘Qui Tam’ Mean?

sean-pollock-203658-unsplash-copy-300x200The United States government uses a number of contractors in many different areas. For example, manufacturers make training gear for the U.S. military, and the prison system has many contracts for staffing the prisons and helping maintain its facilities. Many medical clinics and hospitals receive funding from Medicaid and Medicare contracts.

Just like anyone else, the government assumes that the contractors they are working with will work with them fairly and honestly. When those contractors fail to do so, they may be found in violation of the False Claims Act. Whistleblowers who see this fraudulent activity can then inform the government of the impropriety. This not only helps stop that fraudulent activity, but also allows the whistleblower to claim compensation for prohibiting dishonest acts against the government.

Types of Government Contractor and Procurement Fraud Claims

rawpixel-760036-unsplash-300x289Whistleblowers were given that name because they are essentially “blowing the whistle,” or alerting government officials of fraud committed against the government. Both the federal False Claims Act and the California False Claims Act provide great protection to whistleblowers and often, even compensation for bringing the fraud to light.

Many whistleblowers think that because they are trying to help the government, the law is on their side and they do not need an attorney to help them file the lawsuit. This however, is not true. There are many reasons why whistleblowers need the help of a lawyer who can ensure their claim is filed correctly and that they are treated fairly.

Whistleblowers Sometimes Lose Their Jobs

david-kennedy-412640-unsplash-copy-240x300Nearly every lawsuit or legal action has a statute of limitations. A statute of limitations is the time limit within which the plaintiff, or person filing the lawsuit, can file a claim. Personal injury lawsuits in California have a statute of limitations of two years. Even criminal cases have a statute of limitations, although these will vary depending on the type of crime committed.

When a whistleblower learns of wrongdoing, he or she also has the right to file a lawsuit, although these are different from personal injury or criminal lawsuits, even though criminal charges and damages could result from them. This has many wondering whether or not there is a statute of limitations on qui tam lawsuits. If there is, has that statute already run out?

The Federal False Claims Act

aidan-bartos-313782-copy-300x200People make mistakes in the course of their job every day. When those ‘mistakes’ are intentionally made by a physician or health care billing administrator, though, they are considered fraud. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has spent the last few years cracking down on health care fraud, with the help of whistleblowers.

Billing and coding errors are the most common violations under the False Claims Act. The following are the most common ways those in the health care industry come to be under investigation by the DOJ.

Inaccurate Billing Codes

samuel-zeller-360588-copy-200x300Those who are under investigation for health care fraud may face years in federal prison if they are found guilty, or they ay face civil charges that result in much less severe penalties. It is up to the discretion of the federal prosecutor to determine if the case will be criminal or civil. If you have come forward to report health care fraud, how do you know whether those you have turned in will face criminal or civil charges?

Types of Health Care Fraud

It can be helpful to understand some of the basic laws surrounding health care fraud. The following are come key laws that, when violated, can be result in serious consequences:

tim-mossholder-588403-unsplash-copy-300x200The partial shutdown of the federal government has been going on for almost five weeks as of the date of this article. Many government programs have been negatively impacted. This is especially pertinent regarding whistleblower (also known as qui tam) actions since the federal government is potentially involved in so many of the steps of prosecuting a successful lawsuit.  Furthermore, the lack of government funding that has resulted from the shutdown may also increase the potential for more fraudulent acts that are the impetus for qui tam actions in the first place.

Federal Courts

The status of the federal court system is important when considering federal qui tam actions. This is because the lawsuits are based on a federal law, the False Claims Act, wherein a whistleblower (known under the law as a relator) brings a lawsuit on behalf of the federal government in cases in which businesses have brought false claims to the government for payment. As such, these lawsuits are almost universally brought in the appropriate federal District Court. In the San Francisco area, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California is the most frequent venue for filing qui tam actions. Luckily, for relators, at least, on January 11, Chief Judge Hamilton issued an order providing for the continuation of operations under the Anti-Deficiency Act (see the Order here). Simply put, this means the Court will continue to accept filings, hear, and decide cases without interruption and handle new and existing cases as necessary. This means that, for the Court, at least, the business of justice will continue unimpeded.

samson-duborg-rankin-91091-unsplash-copy-300x200Many people are familiar with whistleblower lawsuits (often called qui tam actions) brought under the federal False Claims Act (31 USC §3729 et seq.) but many states have their own version of the law, as well. California has its own version and was one of the first states to promulgate a state false claims act.

California’s False Claims Act

The California False Claims Act (CFCA) was first enacted in 1987. Like its federal counterpart, it was put into place to encourage the public to help control fraud against the government. It does this by rewarding whistleblowers for coming forward and helping prosecute actions against companies or individuals who are defrauding the government by sharing any recovery with the complaining individual (who is called a relator). The two laws are quite similar, although there are important differences between them.